Little Mole & Honey Bear – New Publishing House of Lost and Found Fairy Tales and Fantasy Stories Publisher: Jack Zipes Motto: Unbury neglected authors and books from the twentieth century, before we are buried. About: Founded in January 2018 by Jack Zipes, Little Mole & Honey Bear publishes unusual books for children and authors largely published during, before, and after World War I and World War II. They celebrate the poetic power of fantasy and illustrate how writers and illustrators have used their art to generate hope in their readers. Though created and published in the twentieth century, all these works are still highly relevant today. Some of the books published by Little Mole & Honey Bear have been translated from foreign languages and are unknown in English-speaking countries. Some of the books are adaptations or re-translations of unknown books. Important in all cases are aesthetic quality and political themes. Didacticism is not welcome. Thus far, Zipes has collaborated with the University of Minnesota Press and Wayne State University Press to publish Fearless Ivan and His Faithful Horse Double-Hump by Pyotr Yershov (2018), The Book of the Hundred Riddles of the Fairy Bellaria  by Charles Leland (2018), The Giant Ohl and Tiny Tim by Christian Bärmann (2019), and Johnny Breadless. A Pacifist Fairy Tale (2020) by Paul Valliant-Couturier (2020). Two more books by Emery Kelen and Deirdre and William Conselman, Jr. will be published in 2020. All books are […]

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Dear Friends, Sorry for bothering you again, but I must report that the person who delivers my newspaper is playing tricks on me. This time she inserted another story into the newspaper, and so, when I opened the pages, there was another crazy story that I shall share with you. These stories keep me sane in an insane world .The President’s Racing Cars When he was younger, the President built a racing car out of wooden boxes and used to race up and down sidewalks scaring the hell out anyone who did not jump at his commands. It was exciting for the boy. He mowed down at least forty people in one year until the police put a stop to his dare-devil races. However, this was just the beginning of his love for cars and racing. On his sixteenth birthday, the President’s father blessed him with a Porsche and bribed a city official who gave the boy a driver’s license before he was legally allowed to drive. Now the President could race up and down the neighborhood streets, and he topped his record of forty mowed people by the time he was seventeen. From that point onward, the President began acquiring all the best and fastest cars and trucks in the world. Then he built a garage behind his home and hired some of the best racers in the world to tend the cars, taking them out for morning runs, fetching special gasoline to speed up the machines, decorating the walls of the vans and trucks, holding races on the track he built behind the garage, and targeting artificial people. The races on his special tracks drew millions of people, according to his reports, and sometimes, even he participated in the races before he was elected president. Nobody could beat him in his specialty – knocking down real live people who wore special padded suits and helmets. They were let loose in a Roman coliseum where lions used to attack and eat Christians, except here, of course, the racing stars would try to knock down human beings. The President starred in this game, but he had to stop participating in them when he was older and became president because he had become somewhat fat and flabby and couldn’t fit into the driver’s seat. This is when the President became fonder of trucks and vans and changed the rules of the game. Though he looked like Porky Pig, the President could now sit comfortably in the huge cabins of the trucks and mow down people to his heart’s content. After God had wiped his hands of the President, there was nothing that stopped him from building a gigantic stadium with gigantic trucks and tiny targets. Since the trucks needed tons of unadulterated gas, the President changed all the laws protecting the environment so he could obtain all the oil and gasoline he desired. He even bought a few countries that produced gas just for his trucks. Nobody cared about the President’s whims except those who were afraid of pollution. Some even laughed at him. If they did, they somehow disappeared from the face of the earth.

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Smack-Bam, or The Art of Governing Men

Come One and All to Magers & Quinn Sunday, January 13,   5pm – 7 pm     Two renowned Minneapolis actors, Maria Asp and Leif Jurgensen, will display how truths can be discovered in fairy tales, while Jack Zipes will speak about how he discovered the political tales of Edouard Laboulaye and why they are still so relevant for surviving in our present perverse world.   Smack-Bam, or The Art of Governing Men Political Fairy Tales Édouard Laboulaye Translated and edited by Jack Zipes Wry political fairy tales from a nineteenth-century politician that speak to our current times Edouard Laboulaye (1811-1883), one of nineteenth-century France’s most prominent politicians and an instrumental figure in establishing the Statue of Liberty, was also a prolific writer of fairy tales. Smack-Barn, or The Art of Governing Men brings together sixteen of Laboulaye’s most artful stories in new translations. Filled with biting social commentary and strong notions of social justice, these rediscovered tales continue to impart lessons today. Inspired by folktales from such places as Estonia, Germany, Iceland, and Italy, Laboulaye’s deceptively entertaining stories explore the relationships between society and the ruling classes. In this collection, Jack Zipes, the most important fairy-tale scholar of his gen-eration, revives the considerable work of nineteenth-century French jurist and politician Édouard Laboulaye, whose fairy tales have not been previously anthologized, much less repub-lished or critically studied This latest discovery is a welcome one, and Zipes’s translations of the tales are […]

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